Saturday, October 5, 2013

Hippie Chic & Think Pink At MFA

There are two fabulous fashion exhibitions currently on display at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. The first is “Hippie Chic” that runs through November 11th in the Lois B. & Michael K. Torf Gallery. First you’re greeted by a retro jukebox filled with all the tunes of era setting the stage for a feast of late 60’s & early 70’s fashions. Dresses worn by gay icons like Barbra Streisand & Cher are matched with crushed velvet suits worn by the likes of The Beatles Sargent Peppers Lonely Hear Club Band. “Hippie Chic” celebrates the designs of innovative boutiques & young designers & includes 54 ensembles in materials from crushed velvet, eyelet, satin, leather techniques & embellishments of tie-dye, patchwork, beads & fringe. With styles from psychedelic to retro this is an exhibit not to be missed. Then head upstairs to the Loring Gallery for “Think Pink” which opened to coincide with Breast Cancer Awareness Month & runs through May 14th 2014. This exhibition displays all shades of pink fashion from the 18th century to present day. This fascinating retrospective explores the history & changing meanings of the color. On display are pink clothing, accessories, graphic illustrations, jewelry & paintings shedding light on changes in style. “Think Pink” also explores the gender evolution of pink for girls & blue for boys as well as fashionable dresses for both genders of children in centuries past. The exhibit includes as well a selection of dresses & accessories from the collection of the late Evelyn Lauder who was instrumental in creating the color for breast cancer awareness. Throughout the month of October the MFA will be illuminated in pink.
For More Info: mfa.org
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